Color

What is CMYK, RGB and PMS?
These refer to color modes available on your software program.

RGB (red, green, & blue) are the primary colors of light. Mixing these three colors in various combinations can produce thousands of colors of light. Computer monitors always display in RGB color mode. Printing requires ink pigment instead of light to produce color.

Offset printing uses four colors – Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black – also known as CMYK. In the same manner, mixing these four ink colors can produce thousands of colors.

PMS, also known as Pantone or Spot colors, are specific colored inks. PMS colors are not created by mixing CMYK ink pigments.

If your artwork is created using RGB or PMS colors, our system will convert the colors to a CMYK equivalent color during the proofing process. Not all RGB and PMS colors have a CMYK equivalent, which can cause significant color changes from your original file to your proof. We recommend creating your artwork in CMYK color mode to minimize the color change.

What if I want to print with more than 4 colors?
Offset printing uses 4-color inks, C (Cyan), M (Magenta), Y (Yellow), K (Key or Black), also known as CMYK. The ink is applied in layers to produce the final colors. It must be stated that mixing the 4 inks can produce thousands of colors. PMS or spot colors will be converted to the closest CMYK equivalent color during the proofing process.
How do I get great color matching?
If the color is critical and vital, we recommend that you order a hard copy proof to accompany your print order. PrintASAP.ng calibrates our presses every day to ensure consistent color reproduction. Although we accept RGB files, we recommend converting your graphics to CMYK to set color expectations to what a printing press can actually produce. RGB images are assigned AdobeRGB unless tagged with a custom profile.
What is rich black?
Rich black is a color combination that will produce a deep, dark, full black off the press. Almost any color combination can be considered a rich black as long as there are 100% black ink and at least 1% of at least one other CMY colors. Please note that CMYK represents, Cyan, Magneta, Yellow and Black respectively. Our recommended rich black combination is 60% Cyan, 40% magenta, 40% Yellow, 100% Black.

Proofing

What is Pre Press Proofing?
Prepress proofing, sometimes called off press proofing, is a cost effective way to get a visual copy of a printing order without having to go through the labor and expense of a physical press proof. This method is not always best though, and when certain requirements like exact color matching are needed then a physical press proof may be the best choice in spite of the extra cost and work involved.
Why is a proof so important?
A proof allows the printer and the customer to check every small detail for errors before the printing process is started. If there are mistakes in the final design and these are not caught until after printing starts this can be much more expensive and time consuming to correct. PrintASAP.ng and you, the customer, should check the proof very carefully before okaying it.
What do you need to know about Bleed?
When you perform the prepress proofing any bleed needs to be taken into consideration. Bleed is the word used for an extra margin that extends beyond the finished page edge. This allows any graphics or images used to go all the way to the edge of the finished pages. If the proof does not have any bleed and this is desired then the printer needs to be informed immediately.
What are the different Proofing Stages Possible?
There are 6 different proofing stages that are possible when it comes to printed materials. These are:

Proofing on the client end
Soft proofing
Hard proofing
High resolution proofing
Blue line proofing
Advanced copy proofing
What is a Soft Proof?
A soft proof is a prepress proofing method that allows you to check a low resolution copy of the file once it is ready for production. This is often provided in a PDF format. A soft proof allows you to check the final design elements and also ensures that the file and the data it contains has not been corrupted in any way.
What is a Wet Proof?
A wet proof is an actual physical printed proof based on the files that you have given the printer. Every element, from the paper and ink used to any specialized techniques, will be present in a wet proof. This type of proof does require special press set up and is more expensive and labor intensive to provide. If specific color matching is desired a wet proof may be best.
What is an HRD Proof?
After the soft proof has been approved by the customer an HRD proof may be used as part of the prepress proofing process as well. This proof uses a chemical based paper specifically designed for proofing to ensure the best color matching profile. The press run colors are mimicked but different stocks and inks are used than what a wet proof involves.
Which Proofing Method is Best?
The best prepress proofing method will depend on the various factors involved in a specific order. In some cases a soft proof can be the most cost effective method available, and the colors in the graphics do not have to be perfectly matched with 100% precision. Sometimes a hard proof may be worth the extra time, money, and trouble though, because you have an exact copy of the final item for proofing. 
What Should you Check in the Proof Proofing Method is Best?
 When you are prepress proofing you need to look at everything, even the slightest details and elements. The final layout of each component, the colors, text, and graphics used, and even the final size of the letters and graphics. Once you give approval for the proof provided the printer will start the printing process, and it will be a lot more money and work if mistakes are found after this point.

File Setup

Popular File Formats?

.AI – Adobe Illustrator. Convert all fonts to outlines and embed
any linked graphics.


.INDD – Adobe InDesign.
Converting your fonts to outlines is recommended if you are not using True Type

.JPG or .JPEG – Photographic images. Set your camera to the highest
resolution if using your own photos. Note that most JPEG images downloaded from
the web are low quality and unsuitable for printing.

.PSD – Adobe Photoshop.
Flatten your layers before submitting your files.

.TIF or .TIFF – This graphic file format will retain the highest possible
image quality.

What is Bleed?
Does your artwork contain images, text, or graphics that
extend to the very edge of the finished piece? This is called “bleeding off the
edge” or simply “bleed.” Files with bleed need to be built to the final trim
size with 
1/8″ extra
on each side for the bleed.

Example:  if you are ordering an 8.5″ x 11″ sell sheet, the
graphic file’s size should 8.75″ x 11.25″.

What is Color Mode?
Do you
need your piece printed in color? Files that contain color text, artwork, or
images must be saved in four color “CMYK” (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, Black) color
mode. Files submitted in the RGB or with Pantone colors will need to be
converted to CMYK. Note that converting RGB to CMYK may cause color shifts as
they are not from the same color spectrum.

(Note: in
certain applications, a spot color ink can be used for Pantone matching)

What is Borders?
Does your piece
contain a graphic or artistic border close to the paper edge? When trimming
paper, there is a cutting tolerance of 1/16″ which may result in uneven
borders. For this reason, we do not recommend borders. However, if they are
necessary for your piece, the border should be at least 
3/8″ from the trim line +
additional bleed.
 If working with standard bleed, this equals
approximately 1/4 inch total.

 

How do I work with Fonts?
Are you
using vector-based software such as Adobe Illustrator or Adobe InDesign? For
vector files, all text should be converted to outlines before creating the file
(preferably PDF) for production.

Are you using a bitmap-based
(a.k.a. raster) software application such as Adobe Photoshop? For bitmap files,
simply flatten the image. Avoid font sizes smaller than 8 pts or fonts that are
very narrow as these may not print well, will lack crispness, or may not
display well against dark backgrounds.

 

What is Safety Zone?
When creating a booklet or similar piece that requires
spiral or wire-o binding, it is important to be mindful of the safety zone.
Printed sheets are punched to accommodate the binding and may interfere with
images or text. Establish a “safety zone” of at least 3/8″ from the edge of the
final binding edge. To avoid any images or text being cut off when the piece is
bound, do not place them in the safety zone

 

What Image Resolution should I use?
While your computer screen
can display low resolution images well, when printed, they will look pixelated,
blurry, or jagged. For best printing results, a resolution of at least 
300 dpi is recommended.
Files with a resolution lower than 300 dpi can be printed, but the results may
be unsatisfactory.

 

Top 5 File Setup Tips to Ensure High Quality Commercial Printing?
1. Use only High Quality Photography or Vector Graphics in your Files. 

2. Convert All Text/Fonts in your design to Outlines

3. Design Your Files using the CYMK Color Palette

4. Include (0.25″) Printing Bleed to Your Overall Finished Size

5. Export Files to a format that does not compress your artwork (TIFF, EPS, PDF, PSD, AI, INDD, QXD)

Artwork

Can You Check My Artwork For Me?
 Yes. Once you have chosen your printed product and uploaded your files, we will run an automatic pre-flight with our File Check service. We check: Size, resolution, bleed, legibility, and alignment! Note: we do not proofread your work so please check phone numbers, addresses, prices, spelling etc. are correct. We will let you know if we come across any issues, we’ll ask you to correct them. If you want Print UK to correct them then there will be an additional charge.

 

What if I want to print with more than 4 colors?
Offset printing uses 4-color inks, C (Cyan), M (Magenta), Y (Yellow), K (Key or Black), also known as CMYK. The ink is applied in layers to produce the final colors. Like a painter’s palette, mixing the 4 inks can produce hundreds of thousands of colors. PMS or spot colors will be converted to the closest CMYK equivalent color during the proofing process.
How do I get great color matching?
If the color is critical, we recommend that you order a hard copy proof to accompany your print job. PrintPlace.com calibrates our presses every day to ensure consistent color reproduction. Although we accept RGB files we recommend converting your graphics to CMYK to set color expectations to what a printing press can actually produce. RGB images are assigned AdobeRGB unless tagged with a custom profile. CMYK files are always assigned Gracol2013.

Design and File Correction

What type of file can I design and supply?
You can supply a
number of different file types i.e. PDF’s, high res JPEG’s or TIFFs. If you are
working with Microsoft office software please convert your file to a PDF before
uploading. 

 

What type of file will produce the best quality output?
For the best results we recommend that you supply vector based PDF’s. Because it is ‘locked’ artwork it ensures that no changes will occur during our pre-flighting system.
Click here to hide/show Div
Please feel free to Chat us up or Request we put a call through and we will respond within 1 hour. 
We are available to chat 247. Please click on the “Lets talk” button by the right hand side.
Reach us by email any time! We’ll do our best to respond as quickly as possible.
Talk to us directly (08094253926) for additional help and immediate answers to your questions. We are available 247
close